Avoid an RV Tire Blowout!



How to help avoid an RV tire blowout. With these tips we hope it will help you minimize your risk of tire failure, in our next RV Newbie Video. Here are some of the products we talked about.

Tire Covers. https://amzn.to/2KhTF2X
Tire Pressure Monitor (good reviews). https://amzn.to/2KvLKLm
Small Tire Pressure Monitor System. https://amzn.to/2tNTdya
Anderson Levelers https://amzn.to/2KvconV
Sailun S637 Trailer Tire we want https://amzn.to/2Kt4bR2

Here is our Amazon page for our favorite gear. We will be adding more products as we find more products we use and love. As an Amazon Associate we earn from qualifying purchases.
https://www.amazon.com/shop/jaredgillis

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Passport America WE USE THIS ALL THE TIME. https://passportamerica.com?rfsn=2638351
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41 thoughts on “Avoid an RV Tire Blowout!

  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Yep. Good information about weighing your rig once it is loaded up! I pick mine up on Friday 8.14 (had a little delay) and the first thing I want to do is weigh my rig empty and then re-weigh it once I have filled it up with water / gas / propane and stuff! Bought some stuff from your Amazon affiliate link: smoke / carbon monoxide alarm and fire extinguisher at the top of my list!

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Thanks man! Great info. I am about a year away from getting my Travel Trailer. I am really trying to do my homework and investigate as much as I can toward R.V. ownership. Channels like yours are great sources of information.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Running over or against curbs are a real tire killer. Running up onto a block of wood is pretty much the same thing. Axle alignment is also critical. You can check for abnormal wear by running the palm of your hand across the face of the tire tread. By running your hand across it should feel smooth in both directions and if it feels sharp to the touch in one direction then you have an alignment issue or maybe a wheel bearing issue.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    The tire store is legally required to sell you the proper size, weight class, speed class and design. The manufacturer has tire requirements on a label attached to the inside of the RV

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    There's 39 months where they made my tires bud, amazing huh…Honey, where is this place? Let's go there next…

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Don't let your tires sit over a month without rolling them, really it matters also if you're retired what the hurry your hauling a house with a bathroom.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Bent axle spindles, flattened springs, worn shackle-straps, under-inflation, uneven load or overload of the coach are the main reasons for uneven tire wear on tandem axles. My last coach had all of the above. After two undercarriage rebuilds, I bought a more capable coach.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    WARNING!!! If you dont check the code date of the tire manufacturing date will play a very big role in life expectancy . When you purchase tires check the date – As a good rule of thumb any tire over 7 years waiting to be installed that is sold as NEW! is going to be a time bomb Dont accept these because the Rubber by that time of 7 years + is going to be starting to dry out… Dealers need to be told and further more Stock needs to be inspected and rotated more as time passes by. I suggest you watch {Beware when buying new tires} Its on you tube This clip was a news produced by ABC News back in 2009 and Please GET THE Word out !!!

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    I have been advised by some (YouTube) to replace ST (Special Trailer) tires with LT (Light Truck) tires. Your video is the first that I have come across that tells me just the opposite. I have a new pop-up A-frame trailer, one axle, two tire camping trailer. The dry wieght is 2200 lbs, with a max weight of 3700 lbs. It has [made in China] tires on, ST235/75R15. I was thinking about replacing with truck tires, but now I am confused. I have seen too many videos of "China-bomb" blowouts, but then I have also seen a number of Goodyear blowouts (recently on national news). Now, I am confused. I am looking for "experienced, on-the-road" advice. Can you help?

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    actually, trailer tires are bias ply nylon reinforced. radials have a sway , the bias plys are more rigid, it is much harder to do the huck a buck if using a tire with little sideways float.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Aerospace 303 works great as a UV inhibitor. Michelin recommends inspection at 5 years for dry rot. Dry rot cracks are allowed up to 1/16" deep. That is according to Michelin. I don't know how you could determine the depth. As others have mentioned the date code is very important. RV and trailer tires age out before wearing out. My father always bought new at 5 years…

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    An infrared thermometer shot at each tire after a drive can give an idea of any big difference in heat. Dragging brake shoes or worn wheel bearings can contribute to blow outs as well. ….. carry on …..

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Keep them aired up and don't go over 65mph.
    Ok, we're done here…

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Newbie here,will a scale show the weight on each wheel?

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Great info. We had a tire on our fifth wheel blowout in New Mexico at 70 mph and 95 deg weather. Got the RV new in 2017 and these are low cost Chinese tires. While they are rated for 75 mph, but we changed them out to tires with 87 mph rating. One they are no longer OEM tires and two the higher speed rating may help in heat distribution at highway speeds.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    I have a 30 foot wildwood at may I ask what tires you would recommend?

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Nobody ever mentions this very important first step when purchasing either a new or used RV, because chances are this step was never done even by the previous owners! Please, please have your tires aligned, yes aligned, single and dual axle units! Every trailer, and fifth wheel comes with slight U shaped axles! The alignment shop or frame straightening shop will turn the axles until the tires face straight forward! Usually the factory does not do a precise alignment before they leave the factory! Our tires blew because of this reason with our single axle coachmen trailer!

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    So you like blowing out those ST tires

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Thanks for the great information here. I had three blowouts the first two years in RV’ing and learned the hard way, but still didn’t know about the monitors. Good real-time monitoring investment.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    I understand that as of September 1, 2017, the RVIA mandated that its members use only radial ST tires (they banned bias ply tires) and that they install tires with a load range that gives a 10% reserve weight capacity based on the axle ratings. I just bought a new 2019 Rockwood Signature 5th wheel that has LR E Castle Rock tires from the factory. Two years ago, they were putting LR D tires on the same size 5th wheel. While they still use off-brand tires, I hope that the increased load range tires will help reduce the number of OE tire failures. I plan to weigh my rig on our first long trip this Spring and if the tires are anywhere near their max. weight of 2,830#, I'll replace them immediately. The only other issue is that the tires are already a year and a half old.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    One big thing to fix that will help you extend the life of your tire is your valve stem do not use the cheap pull in valve stem here's a good high quality bolt in valve stem

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    What is the best to caulk to use to recaulk and re seal with and general things needed to maintain. Like caulking slides yearly type stuff to look out for

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Good video explaining the sorcery of RV tires. The whole mess gets complicated. We have a 34ft 5th wheel pulled by a GMC2500HD and honestly speed will creep up on me. I try to keep it below 65. But I see as a whole many people going far too fast in campers/RVs. There is no reason to go above 70. It’s just too dangerous especially for bumper pulls no matter if your tires are rated for it.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Most important don't buy China Bombs!! I learned the hard way not to buy Les Schwab trailer tires no matter what the price they are junk!! Buy the good stuff, like Goodyear trailer tires. Also, dealers and manufacturers put the cheapest tire they can get away with on new RV's so be careful. And always run tires at max air pressure. Good luck!

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Good information! Have you gotten a tire pressure monitoring system yet? If so, what experience have you had?

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    have you ever seem a rim blow out? No is the answer I had a c class coach with a load range E blow out city most c class come out close to over load entry and come out with with 16 in LT tires light truck tires we had to go G Range with a 90 psi my rims never blew out now nether the my real truck tires

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    I'm not buying the trailer tires are better than truck tires. I'll be pulling my trailer tires off soon and going with truck tires.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    Question to ask you, do you think to have the Nitrogen Air to fill up the tires is the best way than regular air for long travel?
    I love Nitrogen air filled up my Silverado truck and did last longer on tires and made lighter as easy my tires.

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  • September 27, 2020 at 10:05 pm
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    You couldn't be more wrong, trailer tires are for the most part junk. Since trailers don't have people in them the DOT safety rules are aren't as strict as truck tire construction. Trailer tires from most manufacturers recommend changing them every 4 years whether you have 1 mile on them or 10,000 miles because they start to delaminate from within because of poorer construction standards. There's a reason your rig has more expensive truck tires on them the person who owned it got tired of blowouts. I converted my 15 inch rims on our trailer to 16's (They don't make truck tires past C ratings anymore in 15's) and install Michelin truck tires and no more blowouts. Even though the truck tires are over double the price of trailer tires the money you save from the trailer damage after a blowout more than makes up for the price.

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