How To Protect RV Electrical! EMS Surge Protectors And More!



RV Electrical is so important and having a good EMS and RV Surge protector is just the beginning really. The RV Electrical threats range from miswired outlets, Surges, Low Voltage, and Hot Skin conditions. Understanding RV electrical is very important. If you need to review the info in this video you can find it at
https://allaboutrvsinfo.com/how-to-protect-your-rv-electrical-rv-surge-protectors/

DioxIt5. https://amzn.to/33BY1Yj
CRC Heavy Duty Silicone https://amzn.to/2NXHuar
Our Surge Protector
Power WatchDog 30 amp. https://amzn.to/34KpZBp
Power WatchDog 50 amp. https://amzn.to/2NWsaLu
Our EMS Progressive Industries.
Hardwire 30 amp EMS. https://amzn.to/2Kbd6si
Hughes Autoformer 30. https://amzn.to/2CtCmWb
Hughes Autoformer 50 https://amzn.to/2X1gxXt
Multimeter no Contact Kit. https://amzn.to/34NbnB5

Great EMS options:

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34 thoughts on “How To Protect RV Electrical! EMS Surge Protectors And More!

  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I enjoy your content very much. Dielectric grease would be more of an insulator I would think, but a conductive grease that was an anti-oixident would be good as you noted. Thanks for presenting all the information that you do so well.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Awesome video! We just got our first camper. I got the 50a hard wired version because I didn't want to chance leaving it behind accidentally. My brother in law parked his Class A in my driveway shortly after we moved in about 5 years ago. He plugged into my 30a RV outlet in the shop. Turns out it was wired for 220v!! He heard a loud pop at the back of the RV followed by smoke. Fried the panel and cost him thousands. This would have prevented that. The Progressive Industries EMS is worth the cost.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Great video but how do I know which one to get 30 or 50 AMP, yes we are RV Newbies.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I can see that the more Autoformers that are used, the more it drops the over all voltage in an RV Park. The Autoformer is just a transformer with two windings of different turns.
    Using the Autotransformer just allows more people to safely use the existing low voltage of the RV park, and as he said, the result is an overall lower Park Voltage.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    AThe final kicker, the NFPA recommends banning autotransformers, the Hughes Autoformer is not even an autotransformer It’s called the Hughes “Autoformer”, not the Hughes autotransformer. It’s a transformer that “automatically” boosts your voltage when needed, thus the combination of the words auto and transformer. An autotransformer has a single winding inside and the Hughes product has four windings, a different technology entirely.

    So, if someone looks at your grey box and says autotransformers are banned, tell them no, some board members recommend they not be connected. Secondly, you have a Hughes Autoformer which is not banned because it’s not an autotransformer.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    The new code will not effect the autoformer ….for all the reasons I stated below….do your home work

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    You are in correct about the huges autoformer….there is plenty of in depth videos and charts explaining the auto former….here is the basics
    On the 30 amp version when voltage falls below 114 the autoformer uses .6 amps to create 10% more voltage…so let's say voltage drops to110
    Autoformer boost 10% bringing your voltage back up to 121 this voltage is created in the autoformer by using available .6 amps…you will get that .6 back and everything will be running properly….point is voltage is created in the autoformer not taken from the park…so doesn't matter how many people in a park have one.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    My Progressive EMS has saved me countless times. Once, the park we were in had a lightning strike within the park, and several 5th wheels were fried. Later, my Progressive unit started making a loud noise like a chain saw, so I emailed Progressive and they gladly sent me a new unit, they only asked for a few pictures of the EMS, and asked me to cut the cord off so it could no longer be used. I'm a big fan of them.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    is it possible to use one of those ems system inside the RV and also use a cheaper 30 amp for the outside as well? double the protection?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I disagree with you saying it’s not there total responsibility on making sure electric plugs are good ! That’s why you have maintenance person fixing and checking up on these

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    We've recently started RV'ing despite the pandemic… We were tired of our new RV being a very expensive yard ornament. But we do "self-contained" camping at the state parks(while they are still open) here in Ohio. As for snow-birding who knows🤷🏻. I've reviewed this video a couple times and decided to ask because I am not sure I understand. You use BOTH the watchdog AND the EMS? Is that because the portable watchdog surge protector only shuts off if there is a surge?? But the EMS shuts off power if ANYTHING is wrong? So why not just the EMS? So I'm like a Hughes watchdog for $110 or a portable Progressive EMS for $290 🤦 my head hurts? Any classification would be appreciated 🙏

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I'm afraid you only got the Autoformer part half right, starting at about 11:40. It's certainly true that an induction motor driving a constant load like an A/C compressor (constant torque and speed, and therefore constant power) will draw more current as the voltage sags, roughly in inverse proportion to the voltage change. A 10% downward change in pedestal voltage (0.9V) will cause approximately a 11.1% increase in current (V/0.9), ignoring efficiency and power factor, which also droop with saggy voltage. BUT, when you boost the voltage to the motor by 10%, the current through the motor goes back down to where you started.

    So the boost transformer 'trades current for voltage' based on a reduced motor current. In the end, the current for that motor from the pedestal is essentially unchanged, whether you use a boost transformer or not. The boost transformer does waste a very small amount in the form of heat, but the A/C motor and fan run at a higher efficiency and power factor (the percentage of current that actually does work or makes heat), so it's sort of a wash. The benefit to the user, of course, is that the motors draw less current and therefore don't run as hot, which reduces the winding insulation longevity.

    Resistive loads like incandescent bulbs and water heaters WILL draw more current, but only back to where they should be in the first place (they're not fixed loads – those loads vary with voltage), but such loads are minor compared to running multiple A/C units continuously during hot weather, which is where the problem is.

    And no, I don't work for Hughes, or even own an Autoformer. But it's basic transformer and induction motor technology, regardless of who makes the equipment.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    When the EMS kicks in due to low voltage, cutting off power, would it immediately turn the power back on when the voltage picks up again? I'm thinking of brownouts, where voltage drops momentarily and returns to normal very quickly. If this happens, wouldn't this be harmful to at least some 120 V equipment? Are there whole RV UPS systems?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Not fully sure you are correct the autoformer is an issue of dropping the voltage on the park's grid? You are converting the Amps, within the auto former as you call it, to a higher voltage. The voltage and Amps coming from the park's power pedestal stay the same, it is the voltage and amps change within the auto former then onto your rig.. Not going to get into details but there are a couple of good vids that explain that this design it does not have any impact on the park's power grid. There is another kind auto former that is out there that is designed differently that the industry is looking at banning that causes a grid issue. Hughs should have never added the word 'Auto' in its marketing. By its name it placed it into the category, which it is not.

    This explains with science the reason the Hugh's does NOT impact the RV park's power grid:

    https://youtu.be/lMk5gamH0oI

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Thanks great information! I have a Montana 5th wheel 50 amp, but currently running on 30 amp in a campground. Which power watchdog would I buy for surge protection 30 or 50 amp? I'm assuming 30 amp since that's what I'm using. Thanks for the feedback!

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Jared, The Huhges "Autoformer" does not take power away from the power grid, it is not a "automatic transformer" i.e. single winding and a common neutral. Their name is somewhat missleading. The Huhges "Autoformer" has 4 windings 2 primay and 2 secondary windings. You might want to look at Faraday's Law of induction. The Huhges "Autoformer uses that principal type of magnetic field coils to boost the voltage. Most people get this confnused with the water hose theory i.e. Volts is the pressure and flow is the current, that's not how it works with the Huhges Autoformer.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I have a 1986 travel trailer that I live in fulltime. I'm plugged in to my son's house power. Should I have a 30a surge protector, a 30 or 15a low gauge outdoor extention cord? And would a 15a surge protector for the house outlet be needed?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Jared, love your very informative and fact based videos. I have an interesting problem. Just bought a one year old Winnebago Navion in perfect shape. Bought a portable Progressive EMS PT30X and plugged it in to my hard wired 30 amp single phase plug on my garage. Had it plugged into my RV for about 30 hours before my first trip to top off the batteries. Had electrical issues on the trip- no outlet power, heat pump and micro wouldn't work, even with the generator running. Got home, plugged in again, things worked but checked the plugs with my outlet tester. Negative polarity! It had tripped my generator breaker so that didn't work all weekend. Tested the EMS with my voltage meter and found out it was the culprit. Wired wrong at the factory in Mexico. Question is, did I damage my batteries in electrical system with reverse polarity shore power plugged in for 30 hours?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Great vid; thanks. I just bought a travel trailer; my first one. Also, I am electrically challenged. 🙂 I like the hard-wired model; the portable one is too expensive to walk away. However, if there is a problem at the pedestal (for example, surge), does that mean the plug at the pedestal and the wiring between that plug and the hard-wired EMS will get "fried"? If yes, will not that be expensive to repair on the trailer? Maybe portable is better. Conflicted on this.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Really good videos. Do you know if I could use the EMS hardwired if I'm just bringing in a standard 3-prong 15A line? I'm planning on just hooking it up to my house mainly and then running it into a 12V/3000W Multiplus. And if so, do you know which of the many versions I would want to get?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    If using two 2200 watt inverter generators wired together do you need to make a 15 amp plug for both for the end to work?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Good job, Jarrod! You kept it very simple and explained it all for the layman. I'm a retired utility electrical power distribution engineer (40 years) and I couldn't have said it any better. Thanks for the post … keep 'em coming ……. Jim

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Suggestion: When showing a produce turn it towards the viewer. When you look at the product and have it turned so you can read it the viewer gets an angle or side view and cannot read it.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    We plugged in recently and the reverse polarity was faintly lit red for a minute then it went to all green. If it had stayed red would we need to leave? It was l1 and neutral reversed I think

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I completely understand pretty much everything you said, but I have a question.. without breaking the bank and just getting started what would you buy? I'd like to end up with everything you have but that all adds up. Love your vids and going to be using your Amazon store for the purchases 👍

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    I mean, if anyone were to be following NEC properly, you wouldn't have low voltage situations to begin with. You're just swapping one problem for another, in theory. Voltage drop is easily avoidable by having the correct gauge of wire fed from an appropriate panel fed from an appropriate transformer. Anything else is a bandaid at best.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Isn't the EMS Surge just little more advance then the Plug in surge? Are you using both in line of each other?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    GREAT INFO. QUESTION: A 50 AMP RV WANTS TO PLUG INTO A 30 AMP ONLY PEDESTAL. AN ADAPTER IS USED. HAVE YOU NOW CREATED THE "NO REAL LINE TWO" CONDITION? IF YES, WHAT ARE THE PRECAUTIONS?

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    Well done. But you have a misunderstanding about continuous loads. A CB is designed and evaluated to carry 100% of its rated current for an indefinite period of time under standard test conditions of UL 489, Underwriters Laboratories Standard for Safety for Molded-Case Circuit Breakers and Circuit Breaker Enclosures. Molded-case CBs are required not to trip at rated current. But when designing and installing electric, the NEC says you should add a margin of 125% of the continuous load (such as lighting, heaters, machines, motors, etc). Your 80% is correct for planning and installing a circuit, but is not correct for the breaker to deliver the rated amps. It is also very hard to see an RV drawing a continuous max load since our heavy loads: battery chargers, heaters, and ACs, all cycle. A campground breaker should deliver all of the rated amps, or it is defective. This is important to understand because sometimes the campground electrician will incorrectly argue the breaker is only rated for 80% of the stated size.

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  • November 22, 2020 at 12:11 pm
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    It's a sad state of affairs that rv owners need to spend this additional money to protect themselves and their sizable financial investment from the inept money grubbing rv park scum that exists out there. I think it is imperative that we as rv owners take the time to report these parks (there are a lot of them) to whatever forum or organization is available so other rv owners know to steer clear of them as well as reporting them to their local code enforcement department. "rv park does not allow Autoformer" = we know we have inadequate wiring but refuse to spend the money to provide you with the service you are paying for. Sorry but I've been full time for 8 years and have run into my fair share of questionable scenario's along the way. Unfortunately sometimes you end up at an rv park after a long day of driving and are unaware of the shenanigans that are about to unfold so protecting yourself in every way possible is imperative.

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