Three Electrical Testing Devices All RV Owners Should Have in Their Tool Kit



Gary Bunzer, aka the RV Doctor, recommends three test devices that all motorhome owners should carry to ensure a safe electrical connection to a shore power receptacle. Any motorhome owner can perform these simple tests before plugging a motorhome into electricity. Never assume the pedestal you’re plugging into is wired properly. Better to run a few easy tests and be sure it’s safe to use that electrical source. http://www.fmca.com

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17 thoughts on “Three Electrical Testing Devices All RV Owners Should Have in Their Tool Kit

  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Looking off to the side away from the viewer is a bit disconcerting. Otherwise, the video is very helpful and educational. Thank you.

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Why do you need the non contact voltage test? Haven't you already verified the location of the hot slot with the dmm?

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    does anyone know what brake adapter is needed to hook a brake controller up on a 2002  Monaco Diplomat

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    I have been an electrician for over 30 years and your video impressed me. You did your homework and I would do the same checks you did and in that order. Good job!

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    As a result of your great video, I've now performed every one of those checks on my own RV (now that I know how) and have completely elevated the level of RV protection that I formerly had. Now I have my own Hughes Autoformer and I know how to conduct every test. Thank you so much for this video!

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    I effed up big time. 1980 Revcon I put in 2 new batteries. You know where this is going. Should have bought 6 volt instead of 12 volt. Did I ruin everything? Does anybody want me to help them fix electrical problems on their motor home? Why is it so quiet in here? Where might I find the fusible link I cooked? Or did I cook several? It didn't smell like hamburgers.

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Excellent presentation with exactly what you need to know! Thanks! From now on I will always check the current across the two hot slots on any 50 amp service I plug into.
    Related Question: Would my Surge Guard (model 34750) protect my coach in any case even if I did accidentally plug into an outlet where both hot legs were in the same phase (i.e., 240 volt output)?

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Thanks for the great video, Gary! Walmart has these three tools in a single kit complete with a zipper storage case all for ~ $30.

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Nice refresher from a guy who obviously knows what he's talking about.  Great presentation–  Thanks Gary

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Gary,
    You might want to add checking the actual female connector at the post, and also give a short demo on cleaning the actual plugs. I managed a RV park, and some units coming thru had such poor maintenance, there was corrosion so thick it blocked good connections and the required extra amperage draw made for what I call a "hot post" condition. In nearly every case, I was able to resolve the issue with fine sand paper or just a simple non-metalic emery board such as used for finger nails.
    Now if only we can teach people the 30 or even 50 amps, may not be enough power to run 2 AC units, the microwave, do the laundry, AND make coffee!!! LOL
    ~Thanks for a great video~

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Campers sometimes wonder why their electrical appliance is not functioning properly and blame it on the manufacturer but are completely unaware that electrical problems and voltage drops have damaged their appliance over time.

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    Thank you Gary (and FMCA) for putting out some great information that is easy to understand!

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  • September 2, 2020 at 9:17 pm
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    This is an excellent presentation and I learned a few things. However, there are some conditions that these tests will not reveal. Testing the voltage is only an instantaneous test. It will not detect voltage drops at different times during the day. Therefore, I prefer my hard wired power protection unit made by Progressive Industries which will shut me down when ever there are problems with the incoming electrical service until the problem is rectified. It will also produce a code which indicates the exact nature of the problem and with its remote read out inside my little Roadtrek I would not have to go outside at night in the rain to the campground box to determine exactly what the problem is. I have had reverse polarity at a State Park campground electrical box even though the unit was clearly marked for the hot wire and neutral but wired incorrectly. In a private campground in Canada I had a serious voltage drop at night which shut me down which was better than having my appliances damaged.

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